Focusing goals on plant-wide needs.
  • Avoiding improvements in a local work station at the expense of overall plant efficiency.
  • Integration fiorn the tool to the enterprise; and beyond to the virtual factory.
  • These inter-dependent activities cannot be isolated. But too often they are viewed in isolation, and there's a lack of coordination in deploying available factory resources (people, information, materials, tools) to manage work efficiently. The gains made in overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), while important and ongoing, are insufficient because no machine is isolated. We need to focus our attention beyond the performance of individual tools and on to the performance of the whole factory. The ultimate objective is a highly efficient integrated system; not brilliant individual tools. OFE is a composite of equipment effectiveness, cycle time efficiency, on-time delivery, manufacturing costs, yields, production volumes, turn rates, and ramp-up performance; all of which can be measured and improved with manufacturing execution systems (MES), the heart of CIM. This paper addresses the meaning of OFE, its components, and how they can be measured and improved. Key words: CIM, productivity, effectiveness, and MES.">

    Journal of SMT Article

    CAN CIM IMPROVE OVERALL FACTORY EFFECTIVENESS?

    Author: Douglas Scott
    Company: PRI Automation
    Date Published: 7/1/1999   Volume: 12-3

    Abstract: Computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems are as vital to semiconductor manufacturing as lithography, wafer probe, and die attach. They have a huge impact on line efficiency, and information management solutions play a prominent role in helping manufacturers improve productivity and profitability.

    Like wafer fab assembly and packaging, CIM technology changes constantly. 300mm processing, new packages, increasing automation, and the advent of die traceability are bringing significant change to plant floor control systems.

    In their study, The Evolving ChaLLenge of Semiconductor Development, Iansiti and West reported a striking conclusion: "Improvements in performance by U.S., Japanese, and Korean semiconductor companies did not stem from such sources as increased research or scientific breakthroughs. Discovering new technologies was not enough. Successful companies were those most adept at choosing technologies that would work together" [1].

    The manufacturing process is a complex web of highly interdependent activities: interactions between machines, tools, materials, people, testers, processes, departments, and companies. Overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) is about achieving excellence in individual equipment. Overall factory effectiveness (OFE) is about combining activities, the relationships between different machines and processes, integrating information, and the decisions and actions across many independent systems and sub-systems. It's about:

  • Focusing goals on plant-wide needs.
  • Avoiding improvements in a local work station at the expense of overall plant efficiency.
  • Integration fiorn the tool to the enterprise; and beyond to the virtual factory.
  • These inter-dependent activities cannot be isolated. But too often they are viewed in isolation, and there's a lack of coordination in deploying available factory resources (people, information, materials, tools) to manage work efficiently. The gains made in overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), while important and ongoing, are insufficient because no machine is isolated. We need to focus our attention beyond the performance of individual tools and on to the performance of the whole factory. The ultimate objective is a highly efficient integrated system; not brilliant individual tools.

    OFE is a composite of equipment effectiveness, cycle time efficiency, on-time delivery, manufacturing costs, yields, production volumes, turn rates, and ramp-up performance; all of which can be measured and improved with manufacturing execution systems (MES), the heart of CIM.

    This paper addresses the meaning of OFE, its components, and how they can be measured and improved.

    Key words: CIM, productivity, effectiveness, and MES.



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